How to Approach Your First 90 Days at a New Job

African-American-Man-Volunteering-for-CharityFinally – you’ve landed a great job, you can’t wait to get started, and it feels as though the long search and effort in finding the job has come to an end. You can relax. However, quite the opposite is true: now the real work begins, and the first 90 days couldn’t be more critical in defining your career.

Here are a few key things to keep in mind as you approach the difficult but opportunistic first three months at your new job:

1) Ask Questions

As you can imagine, you’ll be facing new territory at any new job, no matter what your experience or background is. Every new job involves a fresh culture, new people and a new way of doing things. You’ll need to ask timely questions when you find yourself faced with uncertainty. The more difficult aspect of this approach is to know when to ask questions and when it’s okay to take some extra time to learn on your own. When in doubt, it is best to speak up and ask – your new manager(s) will be adjusting to your presence as much as you are, and it’s best to make yourself known rather than keep to yourself in the beginning of a new job. When you first begin, you may feel like a fish out of water, unable to contribute a great deal. Consider questions one of the ways that you can contribute and develop a presence within the company. However, never ask questions simply to ask questions – be sure to develop the angle of any question or clarification that you seek out.
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How One Program Sparks STEM Interest in Middle Schoolers

Creating the next great technology innovations is crucial to the advancement of our society and the American economy.  Unfortunately, the American workforce is crippled by a lack of experts in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), which is what we call the STEM skills gap. Since this week is National Engineers Week, we’re doing a three-part blog series on STEM-related topics. In part one, we examined the fastest-growing STEM jobs for 2015. In part two, we looked at the state of STEM in education and the workforce. In part three (this post), we’ll explore a program that helps inspire middle schoolers to become interested in STEM disciplines through exposure to actual STEM professionals. 

According to research done by the DIGITS project in Massachusetts, if you ask a middle- schooler what kinds of jobs use Math and Science, the most common answers are Math Teacher, Banker, or Cashier. But, after they’ve had a visit from a STEM professional through their program, the kids know about Programmers, Medical Technicians, Engineers, Architects and many other careers, and they are much more likely to be interested in studying more advanced topics in Math and Science.
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The State of STEM in America

Engineers-week-4Creating the next great technology innovations is crucial to the advancement of our society and the American economy.  Unfortunately, the American workforce is crippled by a lack of experts in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), which is what we call the STEM skills gap. Since this week is National Engineers Week, we’re doing a three-part blog series on STEM-related topics. In part one, we examined the fastest-growing STEM jobs for 2015. In part two (this post), we look at the state of STEM in education and the workforce. In part three, we’ll explore a program that helps inspire middle schoolers to become interested in STEM disciplines through exposure to actual STEM professionals. 

According to a 2014 report by the General Accounting Office (GAO), nearly all of the nation’s job growth between 2004 and 2012 occurred in STEM fields.  The number of non-STEM jobs remained about the same during that time span. And while the percentage of students earning degrees in STEM fields has increased over the past decade, America still lacks the trained workforce to meet the growing job market. Looking at measures of academic performance on a global scale, the United States lags far behind other countries.
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Hot STEM Jobs in 2015

Engineers-Week-1Creating the next great technology innovations is crucial to the advancement of our society and the American economy. Unfortunately, the American workforce is crippled by a lack of experts in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), which is what we call the STEM skills gap. Since this week is National Engineers Week, we’re doing a three-part blog series on STEM-related topics. In part one (this post), we’ll examine the fastest-growing STEM jobs for 2015. In part two, we’ll look at the state of STEM in education and the workforce. In part three, we’ll explore a program that helps inspire middle schoolers to become interested in STEM disciplines through exposure to actual STEM professionals. 

This year, hiring in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) will continue to show a strong and growing demand. 31 percent of hiring managers plan to create new opportunities in these areas in 2015, which is up from 26 percent last year. Here’s a list of some of the top jobs in STEM to watch, and how to get started if you’re interested in finding a job in that field:
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6 Email Tips for Job Seekers: Don’t Overlook These Common Mistakes

keyboard

Your resume is polished, you’ve written your email cover letter and you’re about to hit send. Before you do, check these things off your list to make sure you stand out for the right reasons:

1. Email Address – Make sure it won’t provoke eye rolls.

Sign up for Gmail. It’s free and widely accepted as the best email service, and most people don’t have a negative opinion of it. Yahoo and Outlook are also acceptable. Just don’t use an AOL email address—no matter what your opinion of AOL, it can be seen as outdated and therefore only used by people who are technology-challenged.
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How To Go From Temporary Worker to Permanent Employee

call-center-womanTemporary employment has seen quite the increase in the last couple of years. Many employers in various industries are hiring temp workers, freelancers and contractors to fill positions for a few weeks or months at a time.

Hiring temporary employees makes a lot of business sense for many organizations, especially those operating in the healthcare, tech, graphic design and retail industries. Most of those sectors see an increase in business at least a few times a year and need more resources to meet the demand. A great example of this would be retail stores hiring temporary workers for the holiday season.

As a matter of fact, the giant online retailer Amazon hired 80,000 temporary workers this last Holiday season to work in fulfilment and sorting centers. The good news is that Amazon has converted over 10,000 of those temporary workers into full-time employees. They’re not the only company hiring seasonal or temporary workers either.
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