Webinar Wrap-Up: Managing a Multi-Generational Workforce in a Customer Service Environment

employee-growth-metricsManaging the differences between the generations in the workplace has proven to be difficult for many business leaders. Generational challenges and dissimilar working styles are ever-present and can cause a disconnect between employers and employees. When you add the headaches associated with a customer service environment to these generational differences, serious operational issues can arise and impact your bottom line. Adecco’s recent webinar, “Managing a Multi-Generational Workforce in a Customer Service Environment,” helps leaders and managers mitigate these issues. In the webinar, topics include a detailed look at the generations in the workforce, leveraging generational strengths, best practices for addressing generational challenges, management tips and advice for helping the younger generations provide excellent service.

Panelists for the webinar include Bruce Tulgan (Author, Founder & CEO of RainmakerThinking), Wendy Slayton (Senior Vice President of Human Resources for Adecco Group North America), Kristen Leverone (Senior Vice President & Global Talent Development Practice Leader for Lee Hecht Harrison) and Lauren Griffin (Senior Vice President of Adecco Staffing, USA). Individuals who attended the webinar earned Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI) credit, which counts toward the certification and recertification process for HR professionals.

If you are interested in viewing the “Managing a Multi-Generational Workforce in a Customer Service Environment” webinar, click here. For those wishing to receive HRCI credit, we will be granting accreditation through October 10, 2014 for those who watch the webinar in its entirety. Please note: In order to receive credit, you MUST complete the form that appears and provide valid information. Your HRCI credit information will be sent within a week of viewing.

If you wish to view only the slides presented in the webinar and are not interested in receiving HRCI credit, click here.
Read more »


USOC Athlete Career Program: Diversity of thought

Adecco recruits and retains a dynamic workforce — where people are recognized for their abilities and career goals.  We’ve partnered with the USOC for the Athlete Career Program — a program which helps aspiring Olympic and Paralympic athletes find work that allows them the flexibility and financial resources to train.

With over 70,000 associates on assignment, Adecco supports initiatives that promote diversity. In this video blog entitled “Diversity of thought”, find out how participation in the Athlete Career Program can assist in your company’s diverse workforce.

Click here to learn more about the USOC Athlete Career Program sponsored by Adecco.


Hiring Mature Workers

Now, more than ever, might A manager giving his millennial worker feedback to better improve his overall performance on the job.be the right time to add a mature worker to your team.

There are many benefits to hiring someone with plenty of workforce experience; chief-among them are problem-solving ability, maturity, motivation, and seasoned communication skills.

There are a lot of misconceptions out there about mature workers; in reality, hiring a mature employee can add an extra dimension of skills, diversity and experience to your workforce.
Read more »


Webinar: Disability Etiquette in the Workplace

Implementing measures to ensure that your workplace treats all employees equally and fairly is no small task. In tomorrow’s webinar at 2 pm EST, we’ll be discussing how to make sure you’re a truly inclusive leader.

You can also earn one general re-certification hour credit towards PHR, SPHR and GPHR recertification through the HR Certification Institute.

Topics we’ll cover include:
Read more »


Moving Beyond Your Native Tongue

The world is changing. Between political conflict and economic competition, the way we relate to other countries has shifted; however, few schools have changed their language instruction. Most high school students can choose from Spanish, Italian, French, German, or Latin. Very few high schools, almost none of them public schools, offer what the U.S. Department of State considers the largest “critical languages”: Arabic, Hindi, Mandarin, Korean, Persian, Russian, or Turkish. The government actively recruits speakers of these languages, and they even offer scholarships for students to study them in-country.

Colleges are doing a better job of addressing the need for language skills, with many offering intensive courses in a few critical languages. Still, the government has recognized that many smaller nations are beginning to play a critical role in the world, whether because they are growing their economies or because of political and social conflict. Only twelve universities in the United States offer Pashto, the language of Afghanistan, and only five go beyond the elementary level. This implies that the government has had to train hundreds of people—an expensive proposition—and rely on native speakers over the course of our conflict.
Read more »


Finding a Job That Actually Relates to Your College Major

I’m an intern at Adecco Group this summer, and this fall I will return to Georgetown University to begin my sophomore year. Next spring, I will be required to declare a major; however, I’ve known what I want to study for a while – the growing field of Linguistics.

I used to think I wanted to be a French major; however, after I began learning German, Latin and Russian, I realized that my interest in language went far beyond a desire to speak them. I wanted to truly understand them. By my senior year of high school, I knew I wanted to major in Linguistics. More college students are pursuing this major because the analytical and writing skills are applicable to a number of areas. But it is not a degree for people without a direction. It is a fascinating science that seeks to understand what really happens acoustically, cognitively, psychologically, socially or culturally when people communicate, and it is my passion.
Read more »