Can we be optimistic after two straight disappointing BLS jobs reports?

Millennial indecisive about his job. He, like many other Gen Yers may be a job hopper.For the second straight month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics “Employment Situation” report showed a slowdown in U.S. job creation. In December only 75,000 jobs were added, followed by January’s increase of 113,000 — both significantly lower than the 2013 average monthly gain of 194,000.

The fact is that December was the weakest month for job creation since August 2012. Employers hired fewer employees than any other month since last June, and layoffs reached a four-month high of 109,000 — which broke a three-month streak of progress. When you see this information and pair it with the tepid job creation numbers, it’s understandable why many believe that economic recovery has truly lost momentum.

But is there a silver lining in these “not-so-great” numbers? Is there something that we can feel positive about? Certainly there is.

First, the Bureau of Labor Statistics ”The Employment Situation – January 2013” report revealed that 638,000 more people said that they had work last month over December. This helped to lower the national unemployment rate to 6.6 percent, making it 1.3 percent less than what it was a year ago, and the lowest it has been in more than five years.
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January 2014 BLS report shows 113,000 new jobs added, unemployment rate of 6.6%

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The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released the January 2014 unemployment report with an overall gain of 113,000 jobs and a relatively unchanged unemployment rate of 6.6%.

With this data being the first indication as to how 2014 kicked off, many experts were looking towards the report for some sign as to how the economy was performing—the fourth quarter of 2013 showed robust growth, but eventually ended weaker than expected. In light of this, many were curious to see if employment numbers would spike back up, or continue the pattern seen at the end of last year.

Unfortunately, the report was not as strong as many hoped for, with a lukewarm gain of 142,000 new private sector jobs. Revisions for November and December showed an additional 34,000 jobs added to the economy, producing a slight silver lining.
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2014 Job Market Perspectives blog series – Part three: The year ahead

singles_ADO_JMP14_v2_Page_01Every year we release our Job Market Perspectives report, which details the current state of the job market broken down by industry sector and region. The report also contains important topics and useful information such as a 2013 year in review, a summary of the last five years, as well as an executive polling section where we take a look at what business leaders are seeing and what challenges we face moving forward.

To coincide with the 2014 Job Market Perspectives Report release, we are publishing a three-part blog series to highlight some of the information in the report. In part one, we discussed the 2007-2009 recession and what impact it had on the job market. In part two, we presented a brief recap of 2013. In the final installment of this blog series, we give you a “sneak peak” of what to expect in the 2014 job market.
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2014 Job Market Perspectives blog series – Part two: 2013, a year in review

singles_ADO_JMP14_v2_Page_01Every year we release our Job Market Perspectives report, which details the current state of the job market broken down by industry sector and region. The report also contains important topics and useful information such as a 2013 year in review, a summary of the last five years, as well as an executive polling section where we take a look at what business leaders are seeing and what challenges we face moving forward.

To coincide with the 2014 Job Market Perspectives Report release, we are publishing a three-part blog series to highlight some of the information in the report. In part one, we discussed the 2007-2009 recession and what impact it had on the job market. In part two, we’ll present a recap of 2013 and show the progress we’ve made in the last year, and in the final installment we’ll present a “sneak peak” of what to expect in 2014.
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2014 Job Market Perspectives blog series – Part one: The recession

singles_ADO_JMP14_v2_Page_01Every year we release our Job Market Perspectives report, which details the current state of the job market broken down by industry sector and region. The report also contains important topics and useful information such as a 2013 year in review, a summary of the last five years, as well as an executive polling section where we take a look at what business leaders are seeing and what challenges we face moving forward.

To coincide with the 2014 Job Market Perspectives Report release, we are publishing a three-part blog series to highlight some of the information in the report. In part one, we’ll discuss the 2007-2009 recession and what impact it had on the job market. In part two, we’ll present a recap of 2013 and show the progress we’ve made in the last year, and in the final installment we’ll present a “sneak peak” of what to expect in 2014.
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2014 Workforce Trends: Part 2 – Where the Jobs Aren’t

201302-wpe-post-headerWith a new year and new jobs data having been released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we are publishing a two-part blog series to highlight some of the latest job market trends. In part one, we discussed job sectors experiencing growth, touched on emerging industries and explored some thriving geographic regions. In part two, we’ll look at some of the industries predicted to decline in 2014 and geographical regions where job growth has slowed. 

The unemployment rate is the lowest it’s been in five years. Job growth in healthcare, technology, construction, and retail is booming. But the good news has yet to reach several sectors of the U.S. economy. As the digital revolution continues to change consumer behaviors and demand, many sectors are increasingly forced to cut jobs, often in staggering numbers.

Declining Industries

There are no surprises here. The industries that will experience the most dramatic decline in 2014 have been suffering for years.
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