Pulling a “LeBron”: How to know if it’s time to return to a former employer

lbj-cavDespite the validation of two championships and an “innovative coach who highlighted him with his system,” LeBron James recently concluded that it was time to “come home” to Cleveland. LeBron’s decision to return to Cleveland was spurred by an internal, sentimental contemplation that is not often seen in big-money decisions in pro sports. As the recent Sports Illustrated article puts it, “…despite all his success, he means more where he was than where he is.” LeBron’s decision to return to Cleveland may be a choice rooted in the world of sports – but the decision is a professional one nonetheless, and serves as a reminder that it is possible, and not uncommon, to return to a former employer. Knowing when to make that choice takes a great deal of consideration, thought, and it is wise to consider the following elements:

Weigh your priorities – not the priorities of others.

For many, career path decisions will continue to become more and more rooted in personal factors. For LeBron, the decision to return to Cleveland was largely personal. For those considering returning to a former employer, it is not unprofessional nor is it unwise to pay attention to your inner negotiator. Often, making the sentimental or “gut” choice can yield positive results; following your intuition typically aligns with your passion, and when following a job for passion, you are likely to excel.
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Stay relevant in today’s job market

OJP0024151For those who have held the same position for a longer period of time or are seeking employment in the middle of their career, here are a few important things to do to keep up with competition while diversifying your skill sets for a rewarding career path.

Brush up on the most widely used applications

Sometimes, staying up to date in the job market is simply a matter of keeping pace with technology. Thomas Kamber, founding executive director of Older Adults Technology Services, says: “The most important skills and technologies for older adults in the workplace are actually the least esoteric. Applications like Microsoft Word, Excel and Gmail are essential for functioning in the modern workplace, and many older adults need to brush up on or develop new skills in these mainstream tools.”
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Five rockstars of the job market

151329130test2014 has shown signs of particular growth – all of which results of key factors, including shifts in the economy and significant current events.

The job market continues to hold strong in a few key industries: healthcare, finance, computer systems and information, and employment services. Although this list isn’t exhaustive, these industries will continue to play a big role in the 2014 job market and the future of the job market altogether. Many positions in these industries require new support roles or other professions that are attainable through a certification process; job seekers should approach large industries with an open mind and consider breaking into new industries through a surplus of emerging support roles.
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5 tips for getting a summer job

Working with recruitersNow that summer is almost at our door, students all across the country will be looking to gain some work experience by seeking out a summer job. Some students will take a summer job to fill the downtime, some do it out of necessity to pay for tuition, and others to put some money aside for other projects such as traveling or buying a car.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there has been an increasing number of high-school and college students looking for summer jobs in the past few years. In fact, that number rose to over 23 million students in July of last year.

Finding a summer job may be easy for some, but for many it can be a struggle since many employers are weary of hiring students with little to no work experience. How can you, as a student, overcome this obstacle and find a summer job that will be both satisfying and help you reach your goals?

Here are 5 tips to guide you:
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Cultural fit in marketing departments

OJP0024131In most marketing departments, cultural fit is defined as having a strong set of soft skills as well as values, beliefs and behavior that are in line with the organization’s culture.

Skills can be taught or improved. Finding a candidate with the right personality and character traits, on the other hand, is often more difficult.

Whether you’re recruiting or seeking employment, cultural fit is something that should be kept in mind throughout the entire hiring process. From the initial phone interview to the final skill assessment — cultural fit is often a deciding factor when it comes to hiring employes, especially in marketing departments.

Cultural fit within a marketing team highly affects work ethic and creativity. It is, therefore, considered by many as a crucial component to building a strong team. Every team will have different dynamics, and it’s important that each team member understands what holds the team together – what makes it tick. For example, having similar working hours, a sense or urgency, and a handle on priorities will help tremendously in building a cohesive team as well as establishing a comfortable, result-driven culture.
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The one thing you must do at every job interview

Top 5 things your human resources department wants you to knowThere are countless rules and tips about what to do and what not to do during a job interview. If there’s one critical thing that every job seeker must do to stand out and to be taken seriously, it is simply ask questions. When you don’t come prepared with thoughtful questions, it says a few things, including: 1) you are underprepared, 2) you aren’t excited about the job or the company, and 3) you’re not visualizing your day-to-day role within the company.

Here’s how to craft questions that will impress your future employer.

Long-term goals

Learn more about the long-term goals for the role you’re interviewing for. Questions like, “what are 2-3 major accomplishments that you’d like to see come out of this role in the next six months?” show that you are aiming to make an impact and hold yourself to a high standard.

Company Culture

Ask your interviewer to describe the company culture and values. By expressing an interest in the heart of the company and going deeper than day-to-day tasks and items that only impact your role, show that you can think big picture – and prove that you care about the company itself. Asking an interviewer about company values demonstrates an important level of maturity and consideration. Moreover, if you are truly seeking a perfect job match, you can learn a lot by asking this question.
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