Celebrating National Staffing Employee Week: Sept. 15-21

ADO-Fb-Image-NSEW (2)On any given day, Adecco connects more than 70,000 talented workers to the best job opportunities across the country. We know just how hard our Associates work and how much time they spend in the workplace. That’s why we want to make sure they have the right position at the right company, as well as the resources to realize their career goals. During National Staffing Employee Week – and every week – we wish our Associates abundant success as Adecco temporary and contract workers. 

What is National Staffing Employee Week?

Organizations big and small work with staffing companies to find skilled contract and temporary workers to fill positions in a myriad of fields and sectors. National Staffing Employee Week was established by the American Staffing Association to honor the millions of Americans who are employed by staffing firms, and is held September 15-21 this year.

Every day in America, there are roughly 2.98 million workers employed by staffing companies. In a year, more than 11 million temporary and contracts workers are employed by staffing companies in the United States. The ASA also reports 79 percent of temporary employees often work full-time; 35 hours per week or more.

Temporary workers have been contributing to the economy for decades, and employers seeking qualified staff are increasingly looking into staffing companies to fill their needs. It should also be noted that the staffing industry generated a staggering $122 billion in sales in 2013 alone.
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Filling The Talent Pool: Industries & places that are hiring

Jobs, at long last, appear to be back.

The U.S. economy added 298,000 jobs in June and another 209,000 jobs in July, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Over the past six months, the economy has added 1.5 million jobs, marking the strongest six-month stretch for hiring since 2006. Meanwhile, job openings in the U.S. recently rose to the highest level in five years.

“It feels to me like the job market is humming,” Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, told the Houston Chronicle.

This is very good news for sure. Yet, good news that comes with a unique challenge. As the demand for workers grows, filling the talent pool becomes increasingly difficult.
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Un-End the Summer with daily prizes from Adecco Staffing USA

Un-end summer imageFor most Americans, the arrival of Labor Day signals the end of pool parties, BBQs and vacation time, and the return to the nine-to-five grind, schoolwork and pasty complexions. This year, Adecco is attempting to change all that. Even though Labor Day marks the unofficial end of the season, our giveaway contest gives you multiple chances to “un-end” the summer and keep the good times going. Enter our contest on Facebook to win great prizes, including an iPad, a 55” Smart TV, a $1,500 airline gift card and more!

How to Enter:

1. “Like” the Adecco Staffing USA page on Facebook

2. Click on the “Un-End the Summer” contest status update or tab

3. Answer our summer-themed poll every weekday from August 18-29 for the chance to win one of ten awesome prizes

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Adecco Engineering & Technology: Minor Change, Major Opportunities 

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Formerly Adecco Engineering & Technical, our science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) division is now Adecco Engineering & Technology. While engineering recruitment is a large part of our business, we also spend a great deal of our time and effort recruiting for Information Technology (IT) roles. Changing our name to Engineering & Technology more accurately reflects the entire picture of who we are and all that we do.
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STEM skills gap: Now is the time to act

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The demand for professionals with STEM backgrounds – meaning Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – is steadily rising. Currently, there are 1.4 vacant STEM jobs for every qualified STEM job-seeker. If this rate persists, by 2018 there will be a projected 1.7 million STEM jobs without qualified applicants to fill them.

Filling this skills gap presents an education challenge for the American job market. A recent article cites that “In 2013, there were 5.7 million total postings in STEM fields. Of those, 76%, or 4.4 million, require at least a bachelor’s degree, and 41%, or 2.3 million, are entry-level jobs requiring less than 2 years of experience.” To that point, only 28% of undergraduate students presently partake in STEM courses in college – even with an abundance of available jobs on the rise in these areas.

Yet, the STEM gap doesn’t begin in college; the fact remains that by the time job-seekers are in college or post-college, it’s too late to develop the necessary background to support open STEM job functions. As such, another route must be taken to fill the growing STEM gap – and it must begin early in the academic journey. To truly impact the STEM gap, students and educators alike must begin looking at earlier education for the foundation of a solid STEM background.

So, we have a solution. But does the majority of the American public know that this serious issue even exists? Does the public know that American children’s proficiencies in math and science are shrinking? And that only 18% percent of all college engineering majors are female?

If the answer to these questions is no, then how do we get the American public on board with early STEM education? The short answer is to educate our public on the STEM skills gap issue and what the crisis means for our future.
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Metropolitan minimum wage increases continue

spaceneedleAt the end of last year, we wrote a blog post about California raising its minimum wage from $8 an hour to $10 an hour, and discussed the pros and cons of raising minimum wage.

This month, Seattle passed a bill that increases the city’s minimum wage to $15 an hour, the highest in the country at almost double the national minimum wage.

The interesting difference between Seattle raising its minimum wage, as opposed to when California raised its minimum wage is that this law is only relevant to those working directly within the city limits. This means that there will be almost a five-dollar difference in pay between neighboring cities.

The impact of this situation is unknown, but people are paying attention. Some of the results economists are watching for include:
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