Webinar Wrap-Up: Managing a Multi-Generational Workforce in a Customer Service Environment

employee-growth-metricsManaging the differences between the generations in the workplace has proven to be difficult for many business leaders. Generational challenges and dissimilar working styles are ever-present and can cause a disconnect between employers and employees. When you add the headaches associated with a customer service environment to these generational differences, serious operational issues can arise and impact your bottom line. Adecco’s recent webinar, “Managing a Multi-Generational Workforce in a Customer Service Environment,” helps leaders and managers mitigate these issues. In the webinar, topics include a detailed look at the generations in the workforce, leveraging generational strengths, best practices for addressing generational challenges, management tips and advice for helping the younger generations provide excellent service.

Panelists for the webinar include Bruce Tulgan (Author, Founder & CEO of RainmakerThinking), Wendy Slayton (Senior Vice President of Human Resources for Adecco Group North America), Kristen Leverone (Senior Vice President & Global Talent Development Practice Leader for Lee Hecht Harrison) and Lauren Griffin (Senior Vice President of Adecco Staffing, USA). Individuals who attended the webinar earned Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI) credit, which counts toward the certification and recertification process for HR professionals.

If you are interested in viewing the “Managing a Multi-Generational Workforce in a Customer Service Environment” webinar, click here. For those wishing to receive HRCI credit, we will be granting accreditation through October 10, 2014 for those who watch the webinar in its entirety. Please note: In order to receive credit, you MUST complete the form that appears and provide valid information. Your HRCI credit information will be sent within a week of viewing.

If you wish to view only the slides presented in the webinar and are not interested in receiving HRCI credit, click here.
Read more »


How to cultivate a strong mentor relationship

Man-and-woman-sitting-next-to-each-otherMentor “matching” goes both ways: a good fit doesn’t mean that it is best only for the mentee; rather, a strong match indicates that both parties are content with the relationship. When approaching someone to be a mentor, you should directly check in and ensure that they can benefit from supporting you in your career. It may seem like a contradiction to the nature of a mentor relationship, but many mentors do benefit from helping up-and-coming professionals.

Traits of a strong mentor

A good mentor is someone who is willing to work for you without doing things for you entirely. They should always provide perspective but never give you the answer without first guiding and/or challenging you to reach it on your own. Here are a few key traits of a strong mentor:
Read more »


How businesses can help close the skills gap

The-skills-gap-is-realAddressing the ongoing skills gap in the job market is a complex challenge that requires buy-in from every party involved: educators, job seekers, educational institutions, and employers and businesses as well. Placing the burden of responsibility on educators isn’t a sustainable solution, though it is true that these institutions require reform and adjustment, especially earlier on in the educational system. To see positive change more rapidly, businesses would be wise to undertake some of the responsibility in closing the skills gap. Here are a few things that employers can start implementing to get job seekers up to speed in the short-term and contribute to closing the skills gap in the long-term:
Read more »


The importance of ongoing customer service training

customer-service-employeesCustomer service training is a sound investment when you consider what’s at stake. Your company’s reputation, customer satisfaction and loyalty
 are all directly impacted by customer service experiences. And ultimately those experiences affect your operating costs – and your bottom line when it comes to profitability.

Research has shown time and time again that people remember negative experiences much more lucidly than positive ones. Bad emotions generally involve more thinking and the information is processed more thoroughly than positive emotions, therefore people use stronger words to describe negative experiences. Further, negative impressions are far more difficult to demolish than positive ones. The proven psychology is just one reason why companies should make it a priority to minimize the number of negative experiences that arise from their customer service departments. What’s the most powerful method of improving customer service? One word: training.

Read more »