Webinar Wrap-Up: Your Questions Answered

multiple hands overlapping for csrOur last webinar highlighted the importance of Using Corporate Responsibility as a Recruiting and Retention Tool. As with many great webinars, the presentation was followed by thought provoking questions from participants.

It seems that our panelists never have enough time to address every inquiry during the live webinar. Rather than let the discourse fade, our panelists selected eight questions they couldn’t leave unanswered.

Questions include:

  • What is the relationship between CSR and Employee Value Proposition?
  • How would you recommend encouraging a CSR strategy buy-in from company executives?
  • We do internal collections (toys, gifts, food), but can’t figure out how to get out into the community. Any suggestions?

Keep reading for practical answers to questions about the strategic and functional implementation of corporate responsibility.
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Webinar Wrap-Up: Using Corporate Social Responsibility as a Recruiting and Retention Tool

Screen Shot 2014-11-06 at 3.52.31 PMThe definition of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is still evolving. It addresses the concept that, beyond merely conducting its business and adhering to legal guidelines, an organization has obligations such as looking after the welfare of its employees, the community, society at large and the environment.

There are three dominant areas where a company’s CSR might focus: environmental sustainability, philanthropy and community, or diversity and inclusion. Adecco’s recent webinar, “Using Corporate Social Responsibility as a Recruiting and Retention Tool”, helps leaders and managers understand how CSR is important to clients, employees and business, the impacts of CSR on recruitment and retention, and best practices for implementing a CSR policy in one’s organization.

Panelists for the webinar include Rich Thompson (Chief Human Resources Officer of Adecco Group North America), Tyra Tutor (SVP, Corporate Development of Adecco Group North America) and Francesca Mauro (Specialty Recruiter for Adecco Staffing, USA).

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Workforce Watch List: Vacation habits

Now that the country is finally thawing out (we hope) after the particularly brutal winter of 2014, vacation plans seem to be on everyone’s mind. Whether your ideal vacation involves the sand and surf of a tropical locale, a rugged camping expedition, a rejuvenating spa retreat, or simply a Game of Thrones marathon from the comfort of your couch, there’s no doubt you are ready to cash in some of your hard-earned PTO days. But the question is: how many Americans actually enjoy their paid time off to the fullest?
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How to Keep Employees Happy: Combat Attrition

job tipsDo you feel passionate about your work and committed to your company? 70% of Americans would be likely to respond “no” to this question.

According to Gallup’s 2013 State of the American Workforce report:

  • 18% are actively disengaged: dissatisfied, unmotivated workers with attitudes that can be contagious to coworkers
  • 52% are disengaged: doing the bare minimum required to keep their job, but without any real connection to their work
  • 30% are engaged: proactive, productive employees who feel personally connected to the company

Low Employee Engagement Increases Attrition

Actively disengaged employees cost the U.S. more than $450 billion each year. Unhappy employees are more likely to leave the organization. Adecco’s 2012 Graduation Survey revealed that 91% of recent graduates would leave a job they didn’t like within a year. Turnover is expensive: on average, replacing just one employee costs 20% of their annual salary.

Attrition occurs when employees who leave aren’t replaced. Ironically, this often results in more turnover, as remaining employees become frustrated trying to “do more with less.” If your company has an employee engagement problem, or if you’re a disengaged employee, you probably already know it.

So how do you solve the problem and avoid attrition? Start by getting inspired by these five companies, who have developed creative employee engagement strategies to keep employees happy and minimize turnover.

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Holding onto Millennial Job Hoppers

Millennial indecisive about his job. He, like many other Gen Yers may be a job hopper.“A generation of job hoppers” is how Millennial branding expert Dan Schawbel described Generation Y workers in a recent Human Resource Executive article.

“While older generations are looking for salary and benefits, Millennials are looking for meaningful and flexible work,” Schawbel said in the article. “What they want from their jobs is different, and that’s why they leave in a couple years.”

And indeed, Millennials typically are switching jobs at a swifter rate than previous generations. A recent study found 60% of Millennials leaving their companies in less than three years, with the average cost to replace that employee between $15,000 and $25,000.

For managers and companies focused on retention, these figures can prove daunting. Yet steps can be taken to help boost your odds of keeping your best millennial workers longer. 
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Seeking Positive Solutions for Millennial Unemployment

Millenials now account for 1 in 3 employees in the workforce.

How do we lower the Millennial unemployment rate?

Lately, much of the national narrative around Millennial employment has been reduced to the blame-game. Some employers and commentators portray Millennials as soft, needy and unwilling to work their way up the corporate ladder. Meanwhile, some Millennials counter that employers won’t give them a fair shake at a decent salary.

The reality, of course, is that neither extreme is accurate. And it would serve everyone well to focus on recent positive momentum and look for constructive ways to get even more Millennials into meaningful, well-paying jobs. In a recent Forbes Blog post, Millennial branding guru Dan Schawbel urged business leaders to support and encourage Millennials, which by next year will account for one in three people in the workforce.
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