Workforce Watch List: The Millennial Generation

In a recent survey conducted by Adecco, we polled workers from the millennial generation to gain insight into their employment goals, workplace viewpoints and career motivations. Millennials are those born between 1980 and 2000 and are quite the hot topic of conversation lately.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, this group of workers is currently seeing an uncomfortable 12% unemployment rate – almost 6% above the national unemployment rate of 6.3% (as of April 2014).

We learned that today’s American youth think they have a harder time than generations before them when it comes to finding a job. Seven in 10 (69%) Americans ages 18-24 believe that it is harder to find a job now compared to previous generations. Interestingly, women in this age group (18-24) are more likely to feel that it is harder to find a job now than it was for previous generations (76% women compared to 63% men).
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Workforce Watch List: Career Goals

This is part three of a three part blog series which presents data from a recent Adecco survey. In part one, we discuss office habits and in part two we explore vacation habits. Check them out for some great workforce insights!

Despite all the turmoil facing the workforce in the past couple years, American career goals have remained consistent. According to a recent Workers Insight Survey conducted by Adecco, the top two career goals are increasing pay (53 percent of respondents) and maintaining a better work-life balance (46 percent of respondents).

Additionally, 26 percent of respondents said their goal was to get promoted and 15 percent of respondents said they want to improve their relationship with their boss.
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Workforce Watch List: Vacation habits

Now that the country is finally thawing out (we hope) after the particularly brutal winter of 2014, vacation plans seem to be on everyone’s mind. Whether your ideal vacation involves the sand and surf of a tropical locale, a rugged camping expedition, a rejuvenating spa retreat, or simply a Game of Thrones marathon from the comfort of your couch, there’s no doubt you are ready to cash in some of your hard-earned PTO days. But the question is: how many Americans actually enjoy their paid time off to the fullest?
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Workforce Watch List: Office habits

According to data in the March 2014 Bureau of Labor Statistics release, Americans spend an average of 34.5 hours per week in the workplace. A majority work more than 40 hours, which is a considerable amount of time spent on the job.

Let’s face it, along with the hard work we produce day in and day out, we bring with us our habits, social tendencies and well, “baggage.” But what types of office habits are prevalent in the typical American workplace? Are they affecting job performance? Are coworkers taking notice of our “baggage?”

In February, Adecco conducted a telephone survey of 507 working Americans aged 18 and over about their workplace habits — among other topics — which revealed some interesting data. Let’s break down some of the findings.
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STEM & vocational skills gaps: The importance of early education

techwomanThe availability of workers with expertise in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or what we commonly refer to as STEM skills, is in decline. The demand, on the other hand, is increasing rapidly. In fact, according to this Business Insider article, a little over 9 million baby-boomers have retired over the past six years, and one-fifth of baby-boomers will retire in the coming years, making this quite an alarming trend.

The jobs exist, but often they cannot be filled because of a lack of STEM or other vocational skills in the emerging workforce. These skills gaps can have very harmful effects on the job market and global economy. All is not lost though, and the future seems rather optimistic.

How can we help fill those gaps and get the next generation of workers involved and interested in STEM-related careers?
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Multi-generational employee motivation

The modern workforce now includes employees spanning four distinct generations. This may not seem significant, but the differences between these generations go beyond age—each has its own knowledge, strengths and weaknesses. Managers must know how to work with each to maintain a successful business.

Managing employees across various generations is difficult, but if you understand a little bit about each generation you will understand what motivates each to maximize their output and leads to a fulfilling opportunity for everyone.

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Traditionalists

As members of the World War II generation, Traditionalists are conventional, frugal and they command respect. Although most are now retired, they are still a part of the modern workforce. As a manager, you should reinforce their need for structure by formally acknowledging their successes and help younger employees follow the written chain of command when interacting with them. A little bit of officially recognized feedback will go a long way with these employees.
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